Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

 

What happens during my first visit?

What do I need to bring with me?

How should I dress?

How long with each treatment last?

How many visits will I need?

Why are people referred to physical therapy?

Who pays for the treatments?

Are there physical therapy specialists?

Is Physical Therapy painful?

Will I get a massage at physical therapy?

What happens if my problem or pain returns?

Can my therapist provide me with a diagnosis?

How does the billing process work?

What will I have to do after physical therapy?

Is my therapist licensed?

 

 

What happens during my first visit?

 

What do I need to bring with me?

Be sure to bring your prescription or referral (given to you by your physician). If you are utilizing insurance to cover your physical therapy visits, bring your current insurance card/cards. If you are covered by Workers Compensation, please bring your claim number and your case manager’s contact information (please provide employer information as well). If you are covered by auto insurance or an attorney’s lien, please make sure to bring this information. 

 

How should I dress?

You should wear loose fitting clothing to make your initial evaluation and treatment as comfortable to you as possible. If you are suffering from a knee injury or post surgical aliment it is best to wear shorts. For a shoulder injury or post surgical procedure a tank top or button front shirt will help. If you are being seen for back problems, wear a loose fitting shirt and pants or shorts. This will also help the physical therapist during your visit to better treat you.

 

How long with each treatment last?

Your initial evaluation will last at least one hour to one and a half hours. Your successive treatments will last a minimum of one hour. We understand time is precious and that an hour or more is a lot to ask, but we set the time schedule based upon your rehabilitation needs. We are committed to your full recovery. We feel it’s not just showing up for the appointment, but the actual completion of your rehabilitation goals and objectives that are of great importance to your safe and full recovery.

 

How many visits will I need?

The number of visits will vary on a case-by-case basis and are determined by you and your therapist. You may only need a few treatments or perhaps months of care. It will depend in part on your therapist’s findings during your initial evaluation and your progress. Naturally, your progress will determine if any adjustments to the original diagnosis and plan are indicated. Your commitment and dedication in the process will play a big part in your rehabilitation outcome.

 

Why are people referred to physical therapy?

Most people are referred to physical therapy because of a movement dysfunction, associated with pain. 

 

Who pays for the treatments?

In most cases, health insurance will cover all or a portion of your treatment. This will be determined when we review your initial paperwork and insurance information.

 

Are there physical therapy specialists?

 

Orthopedic Physical Therapy – Probably the most common physical therapy specialist is the orthopedic specialist. These trained therapists care for the pre and post surgical patients, arthritis, tendonitis, fracture rehabilitation, muscle sprains and strains, neck and back pain, hip and knee problems, shoulder, elbow, and wrist conditions. 

 

Manual Therapy – Manual therapy is a term that describes a variety of hands-on treatment techniques that are applied to movement dysfunctions. Grade five mobilizations, Mulligan mobilizations with movement, Maitland and Kaltenborn techniques, functional technique, neural mobilization, joint mobilization, craniosacral therapy, strain/counter strain, myofascial release, etc. These are some of the more popular manual therapy techniques. Many manual therapists will take continuing education courses, obtain certifications in manual therapy, and will sit for board certification from the American Physical Therapy Association and other organizations. Most physical therapists incorporate manual therapy techniques as a part of a complete treatment plan.


 Geriatric Physical Therapy – Some physical therapists specialize in the rehabilitation of seniors. As our bodies age, a variety of challenges will arise. We stiffen, we lose strength, we lose our balance, our bones become brittle (i.e. osteoporosis), our endurance decreases, and we take longer to recover from injuries. Balance and fall prevention are of great importance to the therapist who is working with seniors and some clinics are solely dedicated to caring for those with geriatric-related physical therapy needs.


Sports Rehabilitation – Experts in assisting with the recovery after injury and surgery. Many sports specialists help with retraining the athlete utilizing running, throwing, jumping and sport-specific programs to name a few.

 

Fitness and Wellness – Physical therapists are well trained to help with your fitness needs and wellness programs. If you need an exercise program, have trouble with your weight, are concerned about osteoporosis, have an issue with diabetes, or you would like to learn how to prevent falls, physical therapists can help.

 

Balance, Dizziness, and Vertigo Rehabilitation – Many suffer from dizziness or BPPV (benign paroxysmal positional vertigo). Some clinics specialize in the rehabilitation of patients with vertigo. Patient education, strengthening, safety awareness, posture and balance exercise, walking exercise, and special techniques that affect sensory and balance centers of the brain and limbs are all important components of any balance rehabilitation.

 

Is Physical Therapy painful?

For many patients, one of the primary objectives ultimately is pain relief. This is accomplished with hands-on techniques, modalities such as ultrasound, electrical stimulation, and or heat or cold therapy. Movement often provides pain relief as well. Your physical therapist will provide you with the appropriate exercises, not only for pain relief but to recover range of motion, strength, and endurance.

 

In some cases, physical therapy techniques can be painful. Recovering knee range of motion after a total knee replacement or shoulder range of motion after shoulder surgery may be painful. Your physical therapist will utilize a variety of techniques to help maximize your treatment goals and to minimize pain and discomfort.  It is important that you communicate the full intensity and duration of pain to your therapist. Without this important information it is hard for your therapist to make any necessary adjustments to the treatment program and schedule.

 

Will I get a massage at physical therapy?
Massage may be a part of your treatment plan. Rehabilitation specialists are trained in a variety of techniques that may help with your recovery. Deep tissue techniques may be part of your rehabilitation process. Massage is used for three reasons – to facilitate venous return from a swollen area, to relax a tight muscle or to relieve pain.

 

What happens if my problem or pain returns?

Flare-ups are usually not commonplace. Should you experience a flare-up (exacerbation), please don’t hesitate to give us a call. We may suggest a return visit to your physician or a return to us for a re-evaluation.

 

Can my therapist provide me with a diagnosis?

In most states, physical therapist cannot make a medical diagnosis. This is something your medical doctor will provide for you.

 

How does the billing process work?

 It is important to understand that there are many small steps (beyond the outline provided above) with this process. Exceptions are also common to the above example. At any time along the way, any information that is missing or misunderstood by your insurance company can also cause delays in payment. It is not uncommon for the physical therapy clinic to receive payment up to six months after the treatment date.

 

 

What will I have to do after physical therapy?

Some patients may need to continue with a home-based exercise program. Some may choose to continue with a gym or trainer-authorized program. Others may complete their rehabilitation and return to normal daily activities. It is very important to communicate your goals to your therapist; he/she can develop a custom program that will be right for you.

 

Is my therapist licensed?

Physical Therapists (PTs) and Physical Therapy Assistants ( PTAs) are licensed by their respective states.

 

Main Office

5501 N Oracle Rd #101
Tucson, AZ 85704

 

Phone: 520-408-9547
Fax: 520-408-8145

Email:

 

Orange Grove Office

1925 W Orange Grove Rd #204

Tucson AZ 85704

 

Phone: 520-297-1550

Fax: 520-297-1556

 

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